China Stories

China Stories

Type:VideoLanguage:EnglishCategories:Current AffairsStatus:On going Description: China has experienced tremendous changes in terms of her economic, social and infrastructural developments in the recent decades. She has progressed from poverty to moderate prosperity. However, prosperity is achieved at the expense of unprecedented social problems, including environmental pollution, food safety issue and moral degeneration. On the other hand, we also see the struggles of individuals. Some parents are ready to do anything to make their children succeed in life; someone still feels emptiness despite the possession of a fortune while someone else still holds to his ideals and beliefs despite numerous failures and attempts …
Upon coming to the crossroad, one cannot help but ask: Which direction will China go?
What has modernisation brought to the 1.3 billion people on the soil of China? What will be the next step?

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My Husband is Gay 00:21:47 2015-10-02
“Tongqi” is a Chinese language neologism for women who have married gay men. To continue the family bloodline is one of the most important values to a traditional Chinese family. Most gay men will choose to marry a woman as requested by parents.

According to Professor Zhang Bei-Chuan, there are around 14 million “Tongqi” in China. Most of them have no idea about the homosexual identity of their partners until their first child was born. Some of them will even not be informed until the end of their life.

Teresa from Wuhan was once a “Tongqi”. Her husband came out to her two months after their wedding. In this documentary, Teresa shares her experience of being a “Tongqi” and how it changed her life. Fortunately, her “Tongqi” experience does not ruin her life. In contrary, she chooses to dedicate her life to help other “Tongqi” to walk out of darkness.

“Tongqi is living beneath a roof of ice,” said by Professor Zhang Bei-Chuan. Nearly none of them is willing to share their story to public openly. However, Teresa is determined to do so, with the hope that she can be the last “Tongqi” in history.

This year’s Lantern Festival in Quanzhou, Teresa, dressed in a pink cheongsam, walking on the street to promote “Tongqi” to thousands of public. Feedback from the crowd is diverse. Some clapped to encourage, while some yelled to fight back. All of the above is the story of Teresa, one of the 14 million “Tongqi” in China.